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Case-Shiller Home Prices: Price Growth Slows in September

CaseShiller Home Prices Price Growth Slows in SeptemberAccording to the Case-Shiller National Home Price Index, annual home price growth slipped to a seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.80 percent in September. This was 0.30 percent lower than August’s year-over-year reading of 5.10 percent.

Cities posting the highest year-over-year gains in home prices were Miami, Florida 10.30 percent, Las Vegas, NV with a gain of 9.10 percent, San Francisco, California posted a gain of 7.90 percent, Dallas home prices gained 7.40 percent and home prices increased by 6.70 percent in Portland, Oregon.

David M. Blitzer, chairman of the S&P Dow Jones Index Committee, said that Florida and the Southeastern region showed sustained strength. Citing gains in builder confidence and housing starts and pre-crisis levels for foreclosures and mortgage defaults, Mr. Blitzer said that the outlook for housing in 2015 should be “stable to slightly better.”

Analysts said that higher inventories of available homes had slowed home price growth. Cooling home prices allow more buyers into the market, which creates a better balance between buyers and sellers. Rapidly increasing home prices in late 2013 through early 2014 forced buyers onto the sidelines as investors and cash buyers drove home prices higher and raised demand for available homes.

Cities Post Incremental Month-to-Month Gains

Case-Shiller’s 10-and 20-City Home Price Indices were 15 and 17 percent below their mid-2006 peaks with 18 of 20 cities tracked showing slower growth in September than in August. Top month-to-month gains were incremental, with Miami, Florida and Charlotte, North Carolina gaining 0.60 percent, Las Vegas, Nevada gained 0.40 percent and Dallas, Texas gained 0.30 percent. Denver, Colorado, Tampa, Florida and Portland, Oregon posted month-to-month gains of 0.20 percent.

Cities posting no month-to-month gain included Los Angeles, California and New York City.

The steepest decline in month-to-month home prices was seen in Washington, D.C. at -0.40 percent., followed by Atlanta, Georgia at -0.30 percent San Francisco, California, Atlanta, Georgia, Chicago, Illinois, Detroit, Michigan and Seattle Washington posted month-to-month declines in home prices of -0.20 percent. San Diego, California and Boston, Massachusetts posted declines in month-to-month home prices of -0.10 percent.

FHFA House Price Index Unchanged in September

The Federal Housing Finance Administration posted no gain on its month-to-month reading for September, although analysts had expected a gain of 0.40 percent from August to September. Year-over-year, FHFA reported a 4.50 percent gain in home prices between the third quarter of 2013 and the same period in 2014.

On a positive note, Seasonally-adjusted home prices for purchase-only transactions rose in 40 of 50 states during the third quarter of 2014. The top five states posting the highest annual home price gains were Nevada, Hawaii, California, North Dakota and Florida.

November 26, 2014 by · Leave a Comment

Buying a Home with a Mortgage? A Quick Guide to Closing Costs and What to Expect

Buying a Home with a Mortgage? A Quick Guide to Closing Costs and What to ExpectWhether you’re just starting to shop for a new home or you’ve already found the perfect new house and you’re ready to submit an offer, if you’re taking out a mortgage loan to cover some of the home’s purchase price you should be aware of the various closing costs you may encounter.

In today’s blog post we’ll share a quick guide to closing costs and what you can expect to pay when you buy a new home.

What Closing Costs Do Buyers Typically Pay?

As you move forward in the home purchase process you’ll incur a variety of fees that cover document preparation, inspections and other services that are required to fully process your mortgage. Your application and processing fees cover the cost of preparing your loan application and submitting it to your lender. Your credit report fee covers the cost of pulling a credit report which is used to assess your suitability for a mortgage and whether your loan is worth the risk.

You’ll likely pay an appraisal fee as you’ll need a proper appraisal of the home’s value, and you may need to pay a flood certification or survey fee depending on where the home is physically located. Additional fees that you may incur include wire transfer fees, commitment fees, courier fees and private mortgage insurance application fees.

Finally you’ll also encounter a number of closing costs that aren’t directly related to your mortgage, including insurance costs, attorney fees, property taxes, government filing or recording fees and more.

Consider Negotiating with the Seller

It may be worth asking the seller to pay some – or all – of your closing costs, depending on the offer that you’ve submitted and how strong of a negotiating position you’re working from. Trust in your real estate agent’s advice in this regard as you’ll want to avoid spooking the seller by asking them to cover costs that they didn’t anticipate.

As you can see, there are a number of different closing costs that you may encounter when you purchase a new home. An experienced mortgage professional will help you to better understand these costs and can show you areas where you may be able to find some additional savings. When you’re ready to buy your next home, contact your local mortgage professional and they’ll be happy to share some advice.

November 25, 2014 by · Leave a Comment

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